10 Weirdest Places in the World you should pay a visit

10 Weirdest Places in the World you should pay a visit

10 Weirdest Places in the World you should pay a visit
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  1. Blood Falls in Antarctica

Blood Falls is an outflow of an iron oxide-tainted plume of saltwater, flowing from the tongue of Taylor Glacier onto the ice-covered surface of West Lake Bonney in the Taylor Valley of the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Victoria Land, East Antarctica.

  1. Sea of Stars in Maldives

Bioluminescent sea plankton that shines bright blue during the night makes the sea area at Vaadhoo Island look like the Sea of Stars. The sea of stars of Vaadhoo Island Maldives attracts millions of tourists every year. The tourist footfall seems to be only increasing after the sea was featured in far and few Bollywood and Hollywood films.

  1. Giant Crystal Cake in Mexico

Giant Crystal Cave at Naica Mine is also one of the weirdest places on the Earth. Deep down in the bowels of the Earth, these huge shiny mineral pillars are enough to make you feel claustrophobic. This mammoth structure has been growing underneath Mexico for more than 500,000 years. It makes for an exceptional case study on how organisms survive in extreme heat and humidity. All nature lovers must visit this place at least once.

  1. Vinicunca Rainbow Mountain in Peru

Vinicunca or Winikunka, also called Montaña de Siete Colores, Montaña de Colores or Rainbow Mountain, is a mountain in Peru with an altitude of 5,200 meters above sea level. Tourist access requires a two-hour drive from Cusco, and a walk of about 5 kilometres.

Covered in wide lines of pastel blue, intense red, green, pink and yellow. There are currently no scientific explanations for this phenomenon

  1. Iguazu Falls in Brazil

One of the widest waterfalls in the entire world. Iguazu Falls will give Niagra Falls a run for its money. The falls divide the river into the upper and lower Iguazu. The power of the falls was not utilized until the construction of Itaipu Dam. It is a dam built jointly by Paraguay and Brazil. It was completed in 1991. If cascading waterfalls mesmerize you, plan a visit to this beautiful destination and prepare to be blown away.

  1. Monolith of Uluru in Australia

This is a single rock. One single, gigantic rock, which is a mountain in itself. With a height of 348 meters and a circumference of 5.8 miles, this is the world’s largest rock and one of the weirdest places on earth. While the rocks surrounding it eroded, it stood its ground to become the longest surviving Monolithic rock structure. If this rock doesn’t inspire you to keep hustling in life and staying true to all the promises you made to yourself, we don’t know what will.

  1. Danakil Depression in Ethiopia

These are not your average run-of-the-mill pools; these are actually acid pools. Even what looks like land are brittle crusts of salt and sulfur. Totally one of the strangest places on earth. The tectonic plates underneath the Danakil Depression continue to move, even after millions of years. Scientists believe that if the movement doesn’t cease, the land will drop further below the sea level.

  1. The Giant’s Causeway in Ireland

The result of an ancient volcanic eruption, these are perfectly straight rocks jutting out of the sea. Around 60 million years ago, this place was subjected to intense volcanic eruptions. As the lava cooled and the smoke enveloping the region disappeared, people found pillarlike structures jutting out. They were amazed and began researching the origin of the Giant’s Causeway. To date, scientists are perplexed by the firmness of these rocks.

  1. Red Beach in China

Red beach is famed for its red-hued sand. It is a renowned tourist attraction. The place receives a tourist footfall of tens of thousands of people each year. The tourists seem to be in love with this place. Every year in autumn, The Red Beach in Tianjin, China comes alive with Suaeda salsa, a red colored plant that thrives well in salt water. The entire beach blooms red, leaving only thin strips of sea visible.

  1. Die Rakotzbrück in Germany

The Die Rakotzbrück bridge constructed in the 19th century is famed for its unique construction accuracy, with the bridge and its reflection merging into a complete and perfect stone circle, no matter where you see it from. Spooky! Probably this is why the bridge is also known as the ‘Devil’s Bridge’. It seems that the makers of the bridge emphasized more on its aesthetics than its utility. Both the ends of the Rakotzbrücke have thin rock spires installed, to make it look like natural basalt columns, which commonly occur in many parts of Germany.

 

 

 

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